It is currently Thu Aug 16, 2018 1:21 am

All times are UTC + 1 hour




Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Other options to financed compensation / ¿Existen otras opciones de financiación?
PostPosted: Fri Feb 21, 2014 1:13 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 19, 2014 3:46 pm
Posts: 37
Are there other options to internationally financed compensation?

¿Existen otras opciones de financiación que una compensación internacional?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Other options to financed compensation / ¿Existen otras opciones de financiación?
PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2014 6:18 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 19, 2014 3:46 pm
Posts: 37
"Another change that I have seen, is that the old idea of social justice and especially the one defended by the Left, defended a broad swathe of rights, including education, health, etc. and included the aims of democratisation and an increase civil participation.

But in the majority of progressivist regimes this has become smaller and smaller and smaller replaced by economic compensation, and monthly financial assistance. I do not doubt this is important and necessary. But these are above all emergency plans. Paying a monthly financial assistance is not synonymous with social justice; social justice is much more than this."

(Quotation of the interview with Eduardo Gudynas)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Other options to financed compensation / ¿Existen otras opciones de financiación?
PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2014 6:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 19, 2014 3:46 pm
Posts: 37
"Science has promoted a lot this concept of ecosystem services and payments for these services which is designed in the mode of our normal science and the normal development with the underlying principles of economic growth and use and economic development, monetary compensation.

Of course there can be alternative models. The problem is that at the end of the day it will cost some money to facilitate a sustainable development in a country without tapping these resources which are so destructive. I understood the approach of the Ecuadorian government to look for money they needed for development. The alternative would be just to declare a region as a living forest and say this is an intact ecosystem and people are living there and they have a good living and we just do not get this area involved in normal development.But this would be a national decision and the question again is what kind of resources are needed for that?"

(Quote of the interview with Pierre Ibisch and Christian Nowicki)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Other options to financed compensation / ¿Existen otras opciones de financiación?
PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2014 10:28 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 20, 2014 7:14 am
Posts: 6
What exactly does it mean to “capture the value of ecosystems”?

Not all monetization pathways lead straight to commodification of the natural environment. Establishing monetary value – even approximately – is for example important when it comes to measuring damage. What penalties should be imposed on the operators of Deepwater Horizon for the damage to ecosystems in the deep ocean in the Gulf of Mexico? What damage is caused by a ship that ploughs through a coral reef? It certainly also makes sense to weigh up whether, for example, it is more costly to invest in water treatment or in the protection of water sources. According to TEEB (The Economy of Ecosystems and Biodiversity), an initiative spearheaded by UNEP, putting a price on nature would make life easier for decision-makers in politics and industry, and moreover, do it in a language that they understand. It would help businesses to recognize risks and enable politicians to perceive the hidden costs and long-term consequences of their actions.

Advocates of the monetization of nature rarely spare a thought for the social context within which “ecosystem services” are provided; indeed, such terms all but obscure the social context. After all, it is not industrious nature itself that is to receive payment for ecosystem services, but its owner. But many of the last intact ecosystems are located in areas occupied by indigenous peoples and local communities. Their traditional ownership rights are jeopardized by new market-based instruments. The most vigorous critics of the UNEP concept point out that natural resources are being commodified in order to make them more attractive to the private sector, thus making them vulnerable to commercial exploitation. Capitalizing on “ecosystem services” has come under fierce attack as a new stage in the privatization and commercialization of the natural environment. Instead of joining forces with local inhabitants to protect natural resources from commercial exploitation, so the accusation goes, business is turning nature into a commodity and not infrequently driving out the local population.

Little attention has so far been given to the tendency to turn all types of natural resources into tradable goods, thereby tying resources such as soil, water and forests even more tightly into monetary loops and trading them as commodities on the global financial markets via financial instruments and products such as derivatives. In the search for new investment opportunities, it is not only raw materials and food markets that are to be rendered attractive to profit-seekers, but also soils and forests, and most notably their capacity for storing CO2. Assigning a monetary value to ecosystem services or to the environmental costs of climate change (e.g. by way of CO2 emissions trading) or biodiversity loss opens the floodgates to the financialization of natural capital. “Climate and environment policy are being made compatible with financial speculation,” according to the analysis of Elmar Altvater (2012). Since we are dealing with an all-out wave of financialization, we need a comprehensive and nuanced debate on the “economics of ecosystems and biodiversity” that is being aggressively promoted by UNEP. The debate needs to be nuanced because the search for solutions in the climate, resource and poverty crisis is not well served by dismissing all aspects of the green economy and all market-based instruments out of hand as “greenwashing,” green capitalism or as a wolf in green sheep’s clothing, a view expressed increasingly vociferously in the run-up to the Rio conference.

More: http://www.af.boell.org/downloads/Criti ... conomy.pdf


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 1 hour


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Template made by DEVPPL